Sunday, May 3, 2015

Paul Tufescu – from church painter to cabin crew







 A positive and informative interview with Paul about Qatar/Emirates/Flydubai

Source:
http://howtobecabincrew.com/from-church-painter-to-cabin-crew/


Paul Tufescu
From church painter to cabin crew

Paul Tufescu, apparently a shy young man, amazed me during a flight with his wide smile and availability to help everybody on board, colleagues included. While working as a church painter in Moldavia, for the love of flying, Paul gave up his job, to join a so-called women’s world, as a cabin crew.

Paul, please tell us about the period when you were a cabin crew at Qatar Airways and also about how the recruitment interview was conducted?

The period in which the first 8 Romanians came to Qatar Airways, in 2003, was a memorable one, considering that I had the chance to be a part of one of the most beautiful stages of this company’s evolution. Why do I say memorable? Because I had the most beautiful flight schedule anyone would have dreamt of during his cabin crew career, with 11 days of layover in Shanghai, 7 days in Singapore, 9 in Bangkok, 5 in Casablanca, 4 in Paris and so on.
During the 7 years spent there, I used to work about 22, 23 days a month with 7 or 8 days off and 30 days of annual leave, which could be used all at once or whenever needed. There have been ups and downs, but what matters most is the personality of the one that interprets the experience. I’ll say that I have always been guided by my flying passion and the desire to do everything as it should be done.
I had my recruitment interview in Dubai. There were about 250 candidates and recruiting officer was the current Manager of the Cabin Crew Department, Saliy Karunanayke, at that time, Deputy Manager of the Cabin Crew Department. The first phase of the interview was the candidates’ introduction. Each had to come forward and present themselves (name, age, occupation, hobbies and why they would like to be a cabin crew). After eliminations, the written English test followed, a very easy one, considering that it consisted of filling in verbs or given words in a text, and finally writing an essay. Then there was a 15 minutes break… “in case anyone wants to smoke”, a recruiter was observing those who were smoking … and after the break another round of eliminations followed, those who smoked being on the list!
After that we have been divided into groups and have been given a hypothetical situation, a shipwreck on an island for my group: what would we do first, once arrived on that island. After the elimination of some other participants, the face-to-face interview with Mr. Saliy followed, who, after convincing himself that my English was good, started looking out of the window, asking me what each building was, who occupied it, and concluded with asking me when would I be able to join their team. Since I had to give the company I was working fort a minimum of 30 days resignation warning, Qatar Airways informed me that I will be given an answer within 2 weeks. And it was a favorable one.

What were you thinking of when landing?

When landing … I may say there are 2 answers: when landing in other countries, most of the time I was thinking about what I should do during my stay in that country: where to go, what to visit, if I had any friends there, and so on. When landing in Doha, most of the time my first thought was to take a good nap, message my parents to let them know everything was fine, then check my roster for the things to be done during the following days, meet some friends, arrange some permit if I was planning to travel on my own and so on.

Have you ever faced any alarming situations in Doha or during your flights?

Alarming situations, allow me to tell you, I had plenty !!!
On a flight Doha-Milan-Rome, we had a snake on board of the plane, which gave me a little headache because, as I was speaking Italian, being forced to make the emergency announcements, I had one of the leading roles, next to the snake :). “Snakes on a Plane” is still a catchy story inside the company.
During two other flights, this time to the DAC (Dakha, Bangladesh) and to LHR (London) I had to handcuff passengers … I would need an entire day to tell you these stories and I would drain my laptop’s battery to tell them in detail. To cut it short, for the London flight, my action was justified by the fact that a Pakistani passenger tried to touch one of my colleague’s private parts. On another flight, this time to MUC (Munich) we had to give first aid to an elder woman who was in an acute alcohol poisoning state.
After all these stories you have told me, it seems futile to ask you if you consider yourself to be a brave person …
No, it’s not futile. As a cabin crew, of course you have to be brave. I think anyone who dares to fly should know that it is a nice, special job, but that it also has risks. Acknowledged risks have advantages and disadvantages; travel isn’t everything, to know for sure everything you need to do, at any given moment, and put these things into practice, makes the difference between someone who is touring the world on a plane and someone who came to do their job. I met a lot of cabin crew members who chose this job to travel the world, without concern for their work but I also met people who understand that this is still a job to be done well, not only to be used as a travel agency.

After the experience with Qatar Airways you preferred working for the Emirates Airline, on a ground staff position, and then again as a cabin crew  for Flydubai. What did the ground staff job imply?

Indeed, at the Emirates I have worked for 2 years at the Ground Staff Department. And it was something special. I have to confess that, at the Emirates, there was the best management team I have ever had! It had nothing to do with the Qatar Airways period, and all the rules they had there. Everything is exquisite compared to Qatar Airways. While I worked for them, I held 2 positions. Six months a year working at the contact centre (Call Centre) and another 6 months as a tour guide, both positions at the Emirates because it is a big company and has many departments, a Tourism Department included. My experience as a tour guide was nice, I had about 50 tourists daily, taking them to visit all of the 7 emirates here and after that I had to perform another type of customer service, this time on the telephone, for the other remaining 6 months.
For my work I was given an Excellence in Customer Service Award.

Did you miss the flying days at Emirates Airlines as ground staff?

Of course I missed flying and so I found a second home with the people from Flydubai, a fast-growing company, a company that finally gives me the opportunity to have my dream job, the cabin crew one, back, with turnaround flights (back and forth at the base on the same day) and a very simple role, but giving me the chance to be at home every day (Dubai), the kind of company that is suitable for families, although I’m still not married.
The flight virus, luckily, brought me back on board! Once you fly for so many years it’s not easy to quit flying, obviously I started applying for other companies for the flight attendant position and was back on board as soon as opportunity arose … Flight is an incurable “disease”!

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Friday, April 3, 2015

Hector & the search for happiness



´´A psychiatrist searches the globe to find the secret of happiness´´

If you guys have the chance to see this movie DO SO :-) truly a motivational, interesting movie, that will make you reflect over your own life. Will make you reflect over a lot of things in life. Regardless what kind of movies you are into, this movie will 100% make you smile. You will for sure shed some tears watching this movie, you will laugh a lot and be a bit sad too watching this movie. This movie will truly touch your soul. 


 

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Interview With a ex Etihad CC :-)






The lovely Rosaine Dalila Scruff had a interview with me a while back, i thought i would share it with you guys :-)
The interview is about a lot of things related to my past with Etihad and my thoughts/emotions about the Cabin Crew job and more :-)

You can read it in Eng here:::


The Portuguese version is here:::



Rosaine Dalila Scruff is a ex cabin crew as well as the author of a book called
 ´´ Crew - The Pain of Glamour´´ which can only at the moment be read in Portuguese. The title of the book in Portuguese is: TRIPULANTES - A Dor do Glamour. I totally recommend reading her book :-)
If you guys want to read her book, the links are at the end of the page via this link:::


TRIPULANTES - A Dor do Glamour Facebook Page: 

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Happy New Year 2015





Happy New Year lovely souls out there
May the new year fill your hearts and
homes with warmth, happiness, peace,
good health, prosperity and love

 May good news and success come your way
Never give up on your dreams and chase that dream of yours that keeps you awake night/day
May 2015 be the best year yet for you guys

May all your dreams come true
 hugs/kisses
ccd





















Monday, December 1, 2014

Stay Patient


17 Things that change forever when you live abroad ♥






 17 Things that change forever when you live abroad

Source:

 http://masedimburgo.com/2014/06/04/17-things-change-forever-live-abroad/#sthash.H9gOIsvz.dpuf

By  Angie Castells


(((( I LOVE this article and all the 17 points are so true, i feel once you set your foot out of your home country NOTHING will ever be the same again in your life. You will never be the same again))))

1. Adrenalin becomes part of your life.

From the moment you decide to move abroad, your life turns into a powerful mix of emotions – learning, improvising, dealing with the unexpected… All your senses sharpen up, and for a while the word “routine” is dismissed from your vocabulary to make space for an ever rising adrenalin thrill ride. New places, new habits, new challenges, new people. Starting anew should terrify you, but it’s unusually addictive.

2. But when you go back… everything looks the same.

That’s why, when you get a few days off and fly back home, it strikes you how little everything has changed. Your life’s been changing at a non-stop pace, and you’re on holidays and ready to share all those anecdotes you’ve been piling up. But, at home, life’s the same as ever. Everyone keeps struggling with their daily chores, and it suddenly strikes you: life won’t stop for you.

3. You lack the (and yet you have too many) words.

When someone asks you about your new life, you lack the right words to convey all you’re experiencing. Yet later, in the middle of a random conversation, something reminds you about ‘that time when’…, and you have to hold your tongue because you don’t want to overwhelm everyone with stories from your ‘other country’ and come across as pretentious.

4. You come to understand that courage is overrated.

Lots of people will tell you how brave you are – they too would move abroad if they weren’t so scared. And you, even though you’ve been scared, too, know that courage makes up about 10% of life-changing decisions. The other 90% is purely about wanting it with all your heart. Do you want to do it, do you really feel like doing it? Then do it. From the moment we decide to jump, we’re no longer cowards nor courageous – whatever comes our way, we deal with it.

´´´´It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to´´´´

5. And, suddenly, you’re free.

You’ve always been free, but freedom feels different now. Now that you’ve given up every comfort and made it work thousands of miles away from home… you feel like you’re capable of anything!

6. You no longer speak one particular language.

Sometimes you unintentionally let a word from another language slip. Other times you can only think of a way of saying something… with that perfect word which, by the way, is in the wrong language. When you interact with a foreign language on a daily basis, you learn and unlearn at the same time. All the while you’re soaking up cultural references and swear words in your second language, you find yourself reading in your mother tongue so it won’t get rusty. Like that time when Homer took a home winemaking course and forgot how to drive.

7. You learn to say goodbye… and to enjoy yourself.

You soon realize that now, most things and people in your life are just passing through, and you instinctively play down the importance of most situations. You perfect the right balance between bonding and letting go – a perpetual battle between nostalgia and pragmatism.

8. You have two of everything.

Two SIM cards (one of them packed with phone numbers from all over the world), two library cards, two bank accounts… And two types of coins, which always end up mysteriously mixing when you’re about to pay for something.

9. Normal? What’s normal?

Living abroad, like traveling, makes you realise that ‘normal’ only means socially or culturally accepted. When you plunge into a different culture and a different society, your notion of normality soon falls apart. You learn there are other ways of doing things, and after a while, you too take to that habit you never thought you’d embrace. You also get to know yourself a little better, because you discover that some things you really believe in, while others are just a cultural heritage of the society you grew up in.

10. You become a tourist in your own city.

That tourist trap you may not have visited in your country only adds up to the never-ending list of things to do in your new home, and you soon become quite the expert on your new city. But when someone comes over for a few days and asks for some suggestions, you find it really hard to recommend but a few things – if it were up to you, you’d recommend visiting everything!

11. You learn how to be patient… and how to ask for help.

When you live abroad, the simplest task can become a huge challenge. Processing paperwork, finding the right word, knowing which bus to take. There’s always moments of distress, but you’re soon filled with more patience than you ever knew you had in you, and accept that asking for help is not only inevitable, but also a very healthy habit.

12. Time is measured in tiny little moments.

It’s as if you were looking through the car window – everything moves really slowly at the back, in the distance, while in front of you life passes by at full speed. On the one hand, you receive news from home – birthdays you missed, people who left without you getting the chance to say goodbye one last time, celebrations you won’t be able to attend. On the other hand, in your new home life goes by at top speed. Time is so distorted now, that you learn how to measure it in tiny little moments, either a Skype call with your family and old friends or a pint with the new ones.

13. Nostalgia strikes when you least expect it.

A food, a song, a smell. The smallest trifle can overwhelm you with homesickness. You miss those little things you never thought you’d miss, and you’d give anything to go back to that place, even if it were just for an instant. Or to share that feeling with someone who’d understand you…

14. But you know it’s not where, but when and how.

Although deep down, you know you don’t miss a place, but a strange and magical conjunction of the right place, the right moment and the right people. That year when you traveled, when you shared your life with special ones, when you were so happy. There’s a tiny bit of who you were scattered among all the places you’ve lived in, but sometimes going back to that place is not enough to stop missing it.

15. You change.

I’m sure you’ve heard about life-changing trips. Well, they’re not a commonplace – living abroad is a trip that will profoundly change your life and who you are. It will shake up your roots, your certainties and your fears. Living in Edinburgh changed us forever in many ways, and if it weren’t for that experience, we probably wouldn’t be about to embark on our next life adventure right now. Maybe you won’t realise it, or even believe it, before you do it. But after some time, one day you’ll see it crystal clear. You’ve evolved, you’ve got scars, you’ve lived. You’ve changed.



16. You fit your home into a suitcase.

From the moment you squeeze your life into a suitcase (or, if you’re lucky with your airline, two), whatever you thought ‘home’ was doesn’t exist anymore. Almost anything you can touch can be replaced – wherever you travel, you’ll end up stockpiling new clothes, new books, new mugs. But there will come a day when you’ll suddenly feel at home in your new city. Home is the person traveling with you, the people you leave behind, the streets where your life takes place. Home is also the random stuff in your new flat, those things you’ll get rid of in the blink of an eye when the time to leave comes. Home is all those memories, all those long-distance calls with your family and friends, a bunch of pictures. Home is where the heart is.

17. And… there’s no turning back.

Now you know what it means to give up comfort, what starting from scratch and marveling at the world every day feels like. And it being such a huge, endless world… How could you choose not to keep traveling and discovering it?



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